Friday, 01 May 2015 11:29

Cargo Securement Standards

In order to be compliant with regulations, drivers and motor carriers must ensure that their cargo securement devices and systems meet the required performance standards. All devices and systems used to secure cargo must be capable of meeting the requirements of §393.102 which addresses protection against shifting and falling cargo.  Steel strapping, cord strapping and other cargo tie downs used to secure cargo must be installed and maintained to ensure that maximum forces acting on the devices do not exceed the manufacturers breaking strength.

Cargo tie downs and securing devices must not contain knots. If a tie down is repaired, it must be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Each tie down must be attached and secured in a manner that prevents it from becoming loose, unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit. Edge protection must be used whenever a cargo tie down would be subject to abrasion or cutting at the point where it touches an article of cargo. The edge protection must resist abrasion, cutting and crushing.

There are exceptions to the above guidelines. These requirements do not apply to vehicles transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items such as steel or concrete beams, cranes, booms, girders, and trusses, which because of their design, size, shape, or weight, must be fastened by special methods.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time contact Redback Industries. To discuss the strength and tension of a particular product and determine which strapping solution is right for you, contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redback.com

Saturday, 02 May 2015 06:07

Cargo Securement Standards

In order to be compliant with regulations, drivers and motor carriers must ensure that their cargo securement devices and systems meet the required performance standards. All devices and systems used to secure cargo must be capable of meeting the requirements of §393.102 which addresses protection against shifting and falling cargo.  Steel strapping, cord strapping and other cargo tie downs used to secure cargo must be installed and maintained to ensure that maximum forces acting on the devices do not exceed the manufacturers breaking strength.

Cargo tie downs and securing devices must not contain knots. If a tie down is repaired, it must be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Each tie down must be attached and secured in a manner that prevents it from becoming loose, unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit. Edge protection must be used whenever a cargo tie down would be subject to abrasion or cutting at the point where it touches an article of cargo. The edge protection must resist abrasion, cutting and crushing.

There are exceptions to the above guidelines. These requirements do not apply to vehicles transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items such as steel or concrete beams, cranes, booms, girders, and trusses, which because of their design, size, shape, or weight, must be fastened by special methods.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time contact Redback Industries. To discuss the strength and tension of a particular product and determine which strapping solution is right for you, contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redback.com

Published in Cargo Securement
Saturday, 02 May 2015 06:07

Cargo Securement Standards

In order to be compliant with regulations, drivers and motor carriers must ensure that their cargo securement devices and systems meet the required performance standards. All devices and systems used to secure cargo must be capable of meeting the requirements of §393.102 which addresses protection against shifting and falling cargo.  Steel strapping, cord strapping and other cargo tie downs used to secure cargo must be installed and maintained to ensure that maximum forces acting on the devices do not exceed the manufacturers breaking strength.

Cargo tie downs and securing devices must not contain knots. If a tie down is repaired, it must be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Each tie down must be attached and secured in a manner that prevents it from becoming loose, unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit. Edge protection must be used whenever a cargo tie down would be subject to abrasion or cutting at the point where it touches an article of cargo. The edge protection must resist abrasion, cutting and crushing.

There are exceptions to the above guidelines. These requirements do not apply to vehicles transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items such as steel or concrete beams, cranes, booms, girders, and trusses, which because of their design, size, shape, or weight, must be fastened by special methods.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time contact Redback Industries. To discuss the strength and tension of a particular product and determine which strapping solution is right for you, contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redback.com

Published in Federal Regulations

At the end of September 2011, The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) network will finish an extremely important pilot project.  Established in November 2010 by container operators that include Evergreen, Hapag-Lloyd, Maersk Line and other companies, the CINS embarked on a project that aimed to reduce accidents caused by improper cargo securement, incorrect weight declaration, and improper packaging.

What did the CINS pilot project involve?

The operators worked in tandem and shared information regarding company cargo accidents, incidents and near accidents.  This information was then compiled in a pilot CINS database.  Using this information, trends were identified concerning high risk load securement and other areas; in turn, this data provided guidance on how to minimize such risks in the future.  Advice how to ensure that cargo will arrive at its destination intact – and general information regarding how to ensure safer container shipping was also given.

How will this pilot project affect the future of the industry?

In the future, the CINS network believes that this database will also show just how widespread certain unsafe practices are in the cargo securement and shipping industry.  In turn, this important information will lead to the proper load securement and shipping legislation changes.  In addition, this information will also result in better load containment and cargo packing training in containers.

Moreover, besides these improvements, the founders of this initiative also hope to improve the quality of cargo delivery and of how individuals in the maritime industry communicate and fulfil obligations.


Redback Industries is committed to bringing you the most up-to-date information on cargo securement regulations.  We have built a strong reputation in the cargo securement industry for providing quality strapping solutions and services at competitive prices.  Redback Industries provides composite cord strappingwoven polyester strapping, and cargo lashing for load securement.  In addition, check out our strap buckles as well as strapping tools and accessories for maximum efficiency and durability.  Find out how we can help you with load restraint at www.redback.com

At the end of September 2011, The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) network will finish an extremely important pilot project.  Established in November 2010 by container operators that include Evergreen, Hapag-Lloyd, Maersk Line and other companies, the CINS embarked on a project that aimed to reduce accidents caused by improper cargo securement, incorrect weight declaration, and improper packaging.

What did the CINS pilot project involve?

The operators worked in tandem and shared information regarding company cargo accidents, incidents and near accidents.  This information was then compiled in a pilot CINS database.  Using this information, trends were identified concerning high risk load securement and other areas; in turn, this data provided guidance on how to minimize such risks in the future.  Advice how to ensure that cargo will arrive at its destination intact – and general information regarding how to ensure safer container shipping was also given.

How will this pilot project affect the future of the industry?

In the future, the CINS network believes that this database will also show just how widespread certain unsafe practices are in the cargo securement and shipping industry.  In turn, this important information will lead to the proper load securement and shipping legislation changes.  In addition, this information will also result in better load containment and cargo packing training in containers.

Moreover, besides these improvements, the founders of this initiative also hope to improve the quality of cargo delivery and of how individuals in the maritime industry communicate and fulfil obligations.


Redback Industries is committed to bringing you the most up-to-date information on cargo securement regulations.  We have built a strong reputation in the cargo securement industry for providing quality strapping solutions and services at competitive prices.  Redback Industries provides composite cord strappingwoven polyester strapping, and cargo lashing for load securement.  In addition, check out our strap buckles as well as strapping tools and accessories for maximum efficiency and durability.  Find out how we can help you with load restraint at www.redback.com

Published in Cargo Securement

At the end of September 2011, The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) network will finish an extremely important pilot project.  Established in November 2010 by container operators that include Evergreen, Hapag-Lloyd, Maersk Line and other companies, the CINS embarked on a project that aimed to reduce accidents caused by improper cargo securement, incorrect weight declaration, and improper packaging.

What did the CINS pilot project involve?

The operators worked in tandem and shared information regarding company cargo accidents, incidents and near accidents.  This information was then compiled in a pilot CINS database.  Using this information, trends were identified concerning high risk load securement and other areas; in turn, this data provided guidance on how to minimize such risks in the future.  Advice how to ensure that cargo will arrive at its destination intact – and general information regarding how to ensure safer container shipping was also given.

How will this pilot project affect the future of the industry?

In the future, the CINS network believes that this database will also show just how widespread certain unsafe practices are in the cargo securement and shipping industry.  In turn, this important information will lead to the proper load securement and shipping legislation changes.  In addition, this information will also result in better load containment and cargo packing training in containers.

Moreover, besides these improvements, the founders of this initiative also hope to improve the quality of cargo delivery and of how individuals in the maritime industry communicate and fulfil obligations.


Redback Industries is committed to bringing you the most up-to-date information on cargo securement regulations.  We have built a strong reputation in the cargo securement industry for providing quality strapping solutions and services at competitive prices.  Redback Industries provides composite cord strappingwoven polyester strapping, and cargo lashing for load securement.  In addition, check out our strap buckles as well as strapping tools and accessories for maximum efficiency and durability.  Find out how we can help you with load restraint at www.redback.com

Published in Federal Regulations

From June 7th to 9th, 2011, the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA), held their annual three day commercial vehicle safety enforcement and education campaign.  More specifically, almost 8000 qualified inspectors examined 70,712 trucks at 2550 locations throughout North America.

Called Roadcheck 2011, this campaign revealed that both the motor coach and commercial motor carrier industries continue to improve with respect to safety issues – including cargo securement.  However, the CVSA’s Executive Director Stephen A. Keppler stated that there was still room for improvement.   Keppler went on to say the following:

“Events that focus on ensuring vehicles and drivers are complying with the law, like Roadcheck and all roadside inspections, draw critical attention to out-of-service rates and are shown to also impact crash reductions.”

About Roadcheck 2011

During this year’s Roadcheck event, about sixteen buses or trucks were inspected per minute in this seventy-two hour intensive campaign. More specifically, truck and bus drivers were asked to display their record of duty status, commercial driver’s license, and medical examiner’s certificate at truck inspection locations.

Along with thoroughly examining for proper load securement – including safe cargo straps and cargo tiedowns – the tires, brakes, lights and other bus and truck safety components were carefully scrutinized by the qualified inspectors.

While this three day safety blitz was definitely an intensive process, it is important to note that roadside inspections take place everyday throughout North America.  In fact, in 2010 alone, just under four million trucks and buses were examined for issues that include cargo strap safety on this continent.

Redback Industries has built a strong reputation in the load containment industry for providing quality strapping solutions and services at competititve prices.  Redback Industries provides composite strapping, woven polyester strapping and cargo lashing for cargo securement.  Find out how we can help you with load restraint at www.redback.com.

Published in Federal Regulations

Steel strapping is available in a variety of widths and thicknesses as well as variations in the grade of steel. Steel is used where minimal stretch is desired. Surface finishes for steel strap include: paint, paint and wax, bluing or zinc and wax. The wax is used to better transmit the tension around the bundle and for use with certain types of tensioners. Common applications include steel coils, bundles of metal, baling wire, bricks and pavers, and roll end-binding.

Unfortunately, there have been numerous accidents over the last few years and with the cost of steel strapping continuing to rise, it is time to replace steel banding with a superior and safer alternative.

Polypropylene strap (oriented or tensilized), also known as poly strapping,  is an economical material designed for light to medium duty unitizing, palletizing and bundling. It is available in various widths, thicknesses, and polymer variations (e.g., copolymers). Some polypropylene is embossed or printed.

This product offers high elongation at break but tends to have irrecoverable dead stretch with constant stress. What is not generally known to end users is that polypropylene strapping will lose about 50% of the applied tension within one hour, and that this tension loss is accelerated with increases in ambient temperature, consequently although suitable for packs with a degree of stored energy that will take up any relaxation that occurs in the strap, unacceptable strap slackness may occur after time if used on product that is ‘Solid’ such as bricks or concrete. Furthermore, polypropylene strapping is susceptible to UV degradation and can quickly degrade if left outside exposed to the elements.

Oriented or tensilized polyester and nylon strapping are stronger than polypropylene and are used as an alternative to steel strapping in the some industries.  Polyester provides excellent retained tension on rigid loads.  Its excellent recovery properties can help a load absorb impact without strap breakage, however polyester strapping can rupture easily on the corner of a load due to its low cross directional strength, especially under high tension.

Ensuring that you adequately secure cargo without damaging the export cargo container or goods’ being shipped is of the utmost importance. Redback strapping stays tight during transit and is ideal for securing heavy or irregular shaped loads inside of containers and rail cars, as well as onto vessels, barges and flat rack containers.

For more information please visit our site at www.redbackindustries.com

Steel strapping is available in a variety of widths and thicknesses as well as variations in the grade of steel. Steel is used where minimal stretch is desired. Surface finishes for steel strap include: paint, paint and wax, bluing or zinc and wax. The wax is used to better transmit the tension around the bundle and for use with certain types of tensioners. Common applications include steel coils, bundles of metal, baling wire, bricks and pavers, and roll end-binding.

Unfortunately, there have been numerous accidents over the last few years and with the cost of steel strapping continuing to rise, it is time to replace steel banding with a superior and safer alternative.

Polypropylene strap (oriented or tensilized), also known as poly strapping,  is an economical material designed for light to medium duty unitizing, palletizing and bundling. It is available in various widths, thicknesses, and polymer variations (e.g., copolymers). Some polypropylene is embossed or printed.

This product offers high elongation at break but tends to have irrecoverable dead stretch with constant stress. What is not generally known to end users is that polypropylene strapping will lose about 50% of the applied tension within one hour, and that this tension loss is accelerated with increases in ambient temperature, consequently although suitable for packs with a degree of stored energy that will take up any relaxation that occurs in the strap, unacceptable strap slackness may occur after time if used on product that is ‘Solid’ such as bricks or concrete. Furthermore, polypropylene strapping is susceptible to UV degradation and can quickly degrade if left outside exposed to the elements.

Oriented or tensilized polyester and nylon strapping are stronger than polypropylene and are used as an alternative to steel strapping in the some industries.  Polyester provides excellent retained tension on rigid loads.  Its excellent recovery properties can help a load absorb impact without strap breakage, however polyester strapping can rupture easily on the corner of a load due to its low cross directional strength, especially under high tension.

Ensuring that you adequately secure cargo without damaging the export cargo container or goods’ being shipped is of the utmost importance. Redback strapping stays tight during transit and is ideal for securing heavy or irregular shaped loads inside of containers and rail cars, as well as onto vessels, barges and flat rack containers.

For more information please visit our site at www.redbackindustries.com

Published in Cargo Securement

Steel strapping is available in a variety of widths and thicknesses as well as variations in the grade of steel. Steel is used where minimal stretch is desired. Surface finishes for steel strap include: paint, paint and wax, bluing or zinc and wax. The wax is used to better transmit the tension around the bundle and for use with certain types of tensioners. Common applications include steel coils, bundles of metal, baling wire, bricks and pavers, and roll end-binding.

Unfortunately, there have been numerous accidents over the last few years and with the cost of steel strapping continuing to rise, it is time to replace steel banding with a superior and safer alternative.

Polypropylene strap (oriented or tensilized), also known as poly strapping,  is an economical material designed for light to medium duty unitizing, palletizing and bundling. It is available in various widths, thicknesses, and polymer variations (e.g., copolymers). Some polypropylene is embossed or printed.

This product offers high elongation at break but tends to have irrecoverable dead stretch with constant stress. What is not generally known to end users is that polypropylene strapping will lose about 50% of the applied tension within one hour, and that this tension loss is accelerated with increases in ambient temperature, consequently although suitable for packs with a degree of stored energy that will take up any relaxation that occurs in the strap, unacceptable strap slackness may occur after time if used on product that is ‘Solid’ such as bricks or concrete. Furthermore, polypropylene strapping is susceptible to UV degradation and can quickly degrade if left outside exposed to the elements.

Oriented or tensilized polyester and nylon strapping are stronger than polypropylene and are used as an alternative to steel strapping in the some industries.  Polyester provides excellent retained tension on rigid loads.  Its excellent recovery properties can help a load absorb impact without strap breakage, however polyester strapping can rupture easily on the corner of a load due to its low cross directional strength, especially under high tension.

Ensuring that you adequately secure cargo without damaging the export cargo container or goods’ being shipped is of the utmost importance. Redback strapping stays tight during transit and is ideal for securing heavy or irregular shaped loads inside of containers and rail cars, as well as onto vessels, barges and flat rack containers.

For more information please visit our site at www.redbackindustries.com

Published in Cord Strapping
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