Friday, 01 May 2015 11:29

Cargo Securement Standards

In order to be compliant with regulations, drivers and motor carriers must ensure that their cargo securement devices and systems meet the required performance standards. All devices and systems used to secure cargo must be capable of meeting the requirements of §393.102 which addresses protection against shifting and falling cargo.  Steel strapping, cord strapping and other cargo tie downs used to secure cargo must be installed and maintained to ensure that maximum forces acting on the devices do not exceed the manufacturers breaking strength.

Cargo tie downs and securing devices must not contain knots. If a tie down is repaired, it must be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Each tie down must be attached and secured in a manner that prevents it from becoming loose, unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit. Edge protection must be used whenever a cargo tie down would be subject to abrasion or cutting at the point where it touches an article of cargo. The edge protection must resist abrasion, cutting and crushing.

There are exceptions to the above guidelines. These requirements do not apply to vehicles transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items such as steel or concrete beams, cranes, booms, girders, and trusses, which because of their design, size, shape, or weight, must be fastened by special methods.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time contact Redback Industries. To discuss the strength and tension of a particular product and determine which strapping solution is right for you, contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redback.com

As required in the Code of Federal Regulations 49 CFR 176.76, cargo, including hazardous materials, transported in vehicles and freight containers must be secured during transport to prevent shifting of the cargo and damage to the container. This requirement is true for all modes of surface transportation due to the fact that containers are transported by vessel, rail, and highway. Accordingly, the cargo must be adequately secured to withstand the unique forces exerted on the packages during each of these modes of transport. Although there are recommended methods, the ultimate responsibility for properly securing cargo inside a container (by blocking, bracing, and strapping) resides with the packer of the container.

Ensuring that you adequately secure cargo without damaging the export cargo container or goods’ being shipped is of the utmost importance. Redback strapping stays tight during transit and is ideal for securing heavy or irregular shaped loads inside of containers and rail cars, as well as onto vessels, barges and flat rack containers.

For more information please visit our site at www.redback.com

POWERLASH Cargo Restraint Systems are designed specifically for project cargo. Comprised of high tenacity polyester webbing, it is kinder on the cargo and is well suited to many types of lashing applications. Polyester straps or cargo tie downs, are more elastic than chains and therefore retain more tension than a chain assembly if the load moves during transport. Using various combinations of webbing, strap buckles and hooks, POWERLASH can quickly accommodate many different strapping methods. This hardware allows the cargo strap to attach to anchor points surrounding the cargo. It also provides a method of introducing tension to hold the item in place and stays tight during transit.

Cargo tie downs are used by thousands of shipping and trucking companies every day. The transportation industry is perhaps the largest user of high strength webbing in the world.

Tougher cargo securement regulations are being adopted throughout North America and laws are moving towards certified cargo restraint systems with indicated working load limit. Redback Industries maintains the highest cargo securement standards in all of our products. For an economical and reliable strapping system, make sure you check out Redback Load Restraint Systems.

Redback Industries carries a complete range of strapping tools and strapping tensioners for securing cargo. Redback’s line of PROSERIES strapping tools is noted for their precision manufacturing, durability, and safety. Industrial strength strapping tools and accessories are economical and require minimal maintenance.

Woven Polyester Cord and Composite Cord Strapping are a safer, more affordable, and easier to carry alternative to steel strapping. Polyester strapping maintains tension over time and absorbs impacts that would normally break steel strapping.

Now, with your first order of 12 coils, get a FREE ¾” windlass strapping tensioner.  Offer valid through June 15.  Redback offers demonstrations and training, corporate pricing programs, free tool and tool repair programs, as well as local inventory and delivery.

Trust the protection of your cargo to poly strapping and strapping tools from Redback Industries. For more information please visit our site at www.redback.com

Published in Cord Strapping

Last year, Washington state exported more per capita than any other state in the nation. In 2010, more than 533 million tons of freight were moved in Washington — a number expected to grow by up to 86 percent by 2040. Washington state senator Maria Cantwell notes, however, that congestion threatens this growth – and the jobs and economic opportunities that come with it. She is currently urging Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood to launch a comprehensive freight initiative at the U.S Department of Transportation.

At Redback Industries we firmly agree with anything which benefits the freight and haulage industries, which is why we created our polycord strapping, at a quarter of the weight of steel and with maximum impact resistance, it improves gas efficiency and ensure the safety and security of your cargo over long distances, no matter what condition the road.

The freight initiative is set to eliminate duplication and focus attention on freight projects that have the maximum benefit to the nation’s transportation network, economy and the taxpayer. Freight congestion and other bottlenecks already cost the nation approximately $200 billion per year, according to Cantwell and her proposed freight initiative would improve coordination and freight planning across all USDOT operating administrations.

Published in Federal Regulations

The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) published in the Federal Register a Notice of request for comments on methods for securing cargo in transport vehicles and freight containers, in order to determine whether a standardized approval or certification process or improvised performance criteria for flexible strapping securing systems is needed. 75 Fed. Reg. 1070-71.

Currently, no certification or qualification standard exists under Federal law for blocking, bracing, or for the use of strapping systems for securing cargo. Under current federal regulation, cargo, including hazardous materials, transported above-ground (either in vehicles, rail, or on vessels) must be secured to prevent shifting of the cargo or damage to the container during transport. 49 CFR Part 176.76. However, the specific method by which the cargo is secured is unregulated. Oftentimes, flexible strapping is used even though it may not always properly secure cargo in transit. The USCG solicits comments while considering whether to implement a standardized certification or approval process for cargo securing systems.

Redback Industries specializes in Woven Polyester cord straps and Composite Cord Strapping Systems which are superior to and safer than steel banding.  Redback strapping is ideal for securing heavy loads, bundled loads and irregular shaped objects. With the cost of steel banding continuing to rise there is no better time to convert to textile banding.

For more information please visit our site at www.redback.com

Published in Federal Regulations
Saturday, 02 May 2015 04:45

Containerization and Load Securing

Containerization originated in early coal mining regions in England and Germany in the late 1700s. By the 1830s, railroads were carrying containers that could be transferred to other modes of transport. Originally used for shipping coal on and off barges, “loose boxes” were used to containerize coal. The early 1900s saw the adoption of closed container boxes designed for movement between road and rail.  Containerization continued to evolve and toward the end of World War II, the United States Army used specialized containers to speed the loading and unloading of transport ships. The first vessels purpose-built to carry containers began operation in 1951 and in the U.S. ships began carrying containers between Seattle and Alaska.

Today, approximately 90% of non-bulk cargo worldwide moves by containers stacked on transport ships. There are many different materials available to stabilize and secure cargo in containers now used in all modes of transportation. Conventional load securing methods and materials such as steel banding have been around for decades. Due to technological advancement there are new load securing options available such as polyester strapping and lashing.  All types of tensioned strapping, particularly steel, need to be handled carefully because of potential injury.

Woven cord strapping outperforms steel banding and provides optimum protection against serious injury to employees and customers. Redback’s POWERWEB absorbs impacts and load shifting that would normally break steel banding, and it will not lash-back dangerously when cut.  For more information please visit our site at www.redback.com

Published in uncategorized

The Port of Grays Harbor Commissioners authorized an $11 million rail construction project recently. Combined with the recently completed first phase rail project, the Port of Grays Harbor is adding more than 36,000 feet of rail capacity in the marine complex to accommodate growing automobile and grain export volumes.

This rural port district on Washington State’s Pacific Coast is demonstrating how their unique transportation links between American producers and growing international markets can stimulate the economy. With export shipping volumes up 85% over 2009 volumes, the Port of Grays Harbor is making strategic investments in rail and marine capacity to ensure their position in global shipping markets.

Although forest products comprise an important part of the Port of Grays Harbor cargo mix, other products like dry agricultural products and automobiles are now the volume leaders through this Pacific Coast port.

Grays Harbor is served by the only active rail system to the coast in Oregon and Washington. Founded in 1911, the Port of Grays Harbor is one of Washington State’s oldest port districts. The Port operates four deepwater marine terminals and hundreds of acres of marine industrial property.

Redback Industries specializes in cargo lashing which stays tight during transit and is ideal for securing heavy loads inside of containers and rail cars, as well as onto vessels, barges and flat rack containers. Redback Industries provides composite strapping, woven polyester strapping and cargo lashing for cargo securement. For more information please visit our site at www.redback.com.

Published in Woven Cord Strapping
Saturday, 02 May 2015 04:58

Factors to Consider in Export Packaging

International shipping puts a number of demands on exporters. There are four potential problems to keep in mind when designing export packaging: breakage, excess weight, moisture and theft.

Export cargo is generally carried in containers. Besides the normal handling encountered in domestic transportation, a shipment transported by ocean freight may be loaded aboard vessels in a net or conveyor which puts added strain on the package. Woven cord strapping can absorb impacts and load shifting that would normally break steel banding. During voyage, goods may be stacked or come into contact with other goods. Once overseas, cargo could be dragged or dropped during unloading.

Avoiding damage to your cargo is the main purpose of export packaging. One of the reasons that containers and pallets have become so standard is that they combine efficiency with unmatched cargo protection.

It is important to take steps to prevent cargo from being tampered with or stolen. Containerization helps with this and using secure polyester cord strapping makes tampering even less likely.

Export packaging should adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Provide proper bracing in the container ensuring that the weight is evenly distributed.
  • Goods should be palletized and whenever possible containerized.
  • Packages should be made of moisture-resistant materials.
  • To avoid theft use cord straps and seals.

Redback Industries specializes in Polyester cord strapping for export packaging. Redback strapping is ideal for securing heavy loads, bundled loads and irregular shaped objects. For more information please visit our site at www.redbackindustries.com

Published in Woven Cord Strapping
Saturday, 02 May 2015 06:07

Cargo Securement Standards

In order to be compliant with regulations, drivers and motor carriers must ensure that their cargo securement devices and systems meet the required performance standards. All devices and systems used to secure cargo must be capable of meeting the requirements of §393.102 which addresses protection against shifting and falling cargo.  Steel strapping, cord strapping and other cargo tie downs used to secure cargo must be installed and maintained to ensure that maximum forces acting on the devices do not exceed the manufacturers breaking strength.

Cargo tie downs and securing devices must not contain knots. If a tie down is repaired, it must be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Each tie down must be attached and secured in a manner that prevents it from becoming loose, unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit. Edge protection must be used whenever a cargo tie down would be subject to abrasion or cutting at the point where it touches an article of cargo. The edge protection must resist abrasion, cutting and crushing.

There are exceptions to the above guidelines. These requirements do not apply to vehicles transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items such as steel or concrete beams, cranes, booms, girders, and trusses, which because of their design, size, shape, or weight, must be fastened by special methods.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time contact Redback Industries. To discuss the strength and tension of a particular product and determine which strapping solution is right for you, contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redback.com

Published in Cargo Securement
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