Friday, 01 May 2015 11:29

Cargo Securement Standards

In order to be compliant with regulations, drivers and motor carriers must ensure that their cargo securement devices and systems meet the required performance standards. All devices and systems used to secure cargo must be capable of meeting the requirements of §393.102 which addresses protection against shifting and falling cargo.  Steel strapping, cord strapping and other cargo tie downs used to secure cargo must be installed and maintained to ensure that maximum forces acting on the devices do not exceed the manufacturers breaking strength.

Cargo tie downs and securing devices must not contain knots. If a tie down is repaired, it must be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Each tie down must be attached and secured in a manner that prevents it from becoming loose, unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit. Edge protection must be used whenever a cargo tie down would be subject to abrasion or cutting at the point where it touches an article of cargo. The edge protection must resist abrasion, cutting and crushing.

There are exceptions to the above guidelines. These requirements do not apply to vehicles transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items such as steel or concrete beams, cranes, booms, girders, and trusses, which because of their design, size, shape, or weight, must be fastened by special methods.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time contact Redback Industries. To discuss the strength and tension of a particular product and determine which strapping solution is right for you, contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redback.com

Saturday, 02 May 2015 06:07

Cargo Securement Standards

In order to be compliant with regulations, drivers and motor carriers must ensure that their cargo securement devices and systems meet the required performance standards. All devices and systems used to secure cargo must be capable of meeting the requirements of §393.102 which addresses protection against shifting and falling cargo.  Steel strapping, cord strapping and other cargo tie downs used to secure cargo must be installed and maintained to ensure that maximum forces acting on the devices do not exceed the manufacturers breaking strength.

Cargo tie downs and securing devices must not contain knots. If a tie down is repaired, it must be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Each tie down must be attached and secured in a manner that prevents it from becoming loose, unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit. Edge protection must be used whenever a cargo tie down would be subject to abrasion or cutting at the point where it touches an article of cargo. The edge protection must resist abrasion, cutting and crushing.

There are exceptions to the above guidelines. These requirements do not apply to vehicles transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items such as steel or concrete beams, cranes, booms, girders, and trusses, which because of their design, size, shape, or weight, must be fastened by special methods.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time contact Redback Industries. To discuss the strength and tension of a particular product and determine which strapping solution is right for you, contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redback.com

Published in Cargo Securement
Saturday, 02 May 2015 06:07

Cargo Securement Standards

In order to be compliant with regulations, drivers and motor carriers must ensure that their cargo securement devices and systems meet the required performance standards. All devices and systems used to secure cargo must be capable of meeting the requirements of §393.102 which addresses protection against shifting and falling cargo.  Steel strapping, cord strapping and other cargo tie downs used to secure cargo must be installed and maintained to ensure that maximum forces acting on the devices do not exceed the manufacturers breaking strength.

Cargo tie downs and securing devices must not contain knots. If a tie down is repaired, it must be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Each tie down must be attached and secured in a manner that prevents it from becoming loose, unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit. Edge protection must be used whenever a cargo tie down would be subject to abrasion or cutting at the point where it touches an article of cargo. The edge protection must resist abrasion, cutting and crushing.

There are exceptions to the above guidelines. These requirements do not apply to vehicles transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items such as steel or concrete beams, cranes, booms, girders, and trusses, which because of their design, size, shape, or weight, must be fastened by special methods.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time contact Redback Industries. To discuss the strength and tension of a particular product and determine which strapping solution is right for you, contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redback.com

Published in Federal Regulations

At the end of September 2011, The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) network will finish an extremely important pilot project.  Established in November 2010 by container operators that include Evergreen, Hapag-Lloyd, Maersk Line and other companies, the CINS embarked on a project that aimed to reduce accidents caused by improper cargo securement, incorrect weight declaration, and improper packaging.

What did the CINS pilot project involve?

The operators worked in tandem and shared information regarding company cargo accidents, incidents and near accidents.  This information was then compiled in a pilot CINS database.  Using this information, trends were identified concerning high risk load securement and other areas; in turn, this data provided guidance on how to minimize such risks in the future.  Advice how to ensure that cargo will arrive at its destination intact – and general information regarding how to ensure safer container shipping was also given.

How will this pilot project affect the future of the industry?

In the future, the CINS network believes that this database will also show just how widespread certain unsafe practices are in the cargo securement and shipping industry.  In turn, this important information will lead to the proper load securement and shipping legislation changes.  In addition, this information will also result in better load containment and cargo packing training in containers.

Moreover, besides these improvements, the founders of this initiative also hope to improve the quality of cargo delivery and of how individuals in the maritime industry communicate and fulfil obligations.


Redback Industries is committed to bringing you the most up-to-date information on cargo securement regulations.  We have built a strong reputation in the cargo securement industry for providing quality strapping solutions and services at competitive prices.  Redback Industries provides composite cord strappingwoven polyester strapping, and cargo lashing for load securement.  In addition, check out our strap buckles as well as strapping tools and accessories for maximum efficiency and durability.  Find out how we can help you with load restraint at www.redback.com

At the end of September 2011, The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) network will finish an extremely important pilot project.  Established in November 2010 by container operators that include Evergreen, Hapag-Lloyd, Maersk Line and other companies, the CINS embarked on a project that aimed to reduce accidents caused by improper cargo securement, incorrect weight declaration, and improper packaging.

What did the CINS pilot project involve?

The operators worked in tandem and shared information regarding company cargo accidents, incidents and near accidents.  This information was then compiled in a pilot CINS database.  Using this information, trends were identified concerning high risk load securement and other areas; in turn, this data provided guidance on how to minimize such risks in the future.  Advice how to ensure that cargo will arrive at its destination intact – and general information regarding how to ensure safer container shipping was also given.

How will this pilot project affect the future of the industry?

In the future, the CINS network believes that this database will also show just how widespread certain unsafe practices are in the cargo securement and shipping industry.  In turn, this important information will lead to the proper load securement and shipping legislation changes.  In addition, this information will also result in better load containment and cargo packing training in containers.

Moreover, besides these improvements, the founders of this initiative also hope to improve the quality of cargo delivery and of how individuals in the maritime industry communicate and fulfil obligations.


Redback Industries is committed to bringing you the most up-to-date information on cargo securement regulations.  We have built a strong reputation in the cargo securement industry for providing quality strapping solutions and services at competitive prices.  Redback Industries provides composite cord strappingwoven polyester strapping, and cargo lashing for load securement.  In addition, check out our strap buckles as well as strapping tools and accessories for maximum efficiency and durability.  Find out how we can help you with load restraint at www.redback.com

Published in Cargo Securement

At the end of September 2011, The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) network will finish an extremely important pilot project.  Established in November 2010 by container operators that include Evergreen, Hapag-Lloyd, Maersk Line and other companies, the CINS embarked on a project that aimed to reduce accidents caused by improper cargo securement, incorrect weight declaration, and improper packaging.

What did the CINS pilot project involve?

The operators worked in tandem and shared information regarding company cargo accidents, incidents and near accidents.  This information was then compiled in a pilot CINS database.  Using this information, trends were identified concerning high risk load securement and other areas; in turn, this data provided guidance on how to minimize such risks in the future.  Advice how to ensure that cargo will arrive at its destination intact – and general information regarding how to ensure safer container shipping was also given.

How will this pilot project affect the future of the industry?

In the future, the CINS network believes that this database will also show just how widespread certain unsafe practices are in the cargo securement and shipping industry.  In turn, this important information will lead to the proper load securement and shipping legislation changes.  In addition, this information will also result in better load containment and cargo packing training in containers.

Moreover, besides these improvements, the founders of this initiative also hope to improve the quality of cargo delivery and of how individuals in the maritime industry communicate and fulfil obligations.


Redback Industries is committed to bringing you the most up-to-date information on cargo securement regulations.  We have built a strong reputation in the cargo securement industry for providing quality strapping solutions and services at competitive prices.  Redback Industries provides composite cord strappingwoven polyester strapping, and cargo lashing for load securement.  In addition, check out our strap buckles as well as strapping tools and accessories for maximum efficiency and durability.  Find out how we can help you with load restraint at www.redback.com

Published in Federal Regulations
Saturday, 02 May 2015 04:45

Containerization and Load Securing

Containerization originated in early coal mining regions in England and Germany in the late 1700s. By the 1830s, railroads were carrying containers that could be transferred to other modes of transport. Originally used for shipping coal on and off barges, “loose boxes” were used to containerize coal. The early 1900s saw the adoption of closed container boxes designed for movement between road and rail.  Containerization continued to evolve and toward the end of World War II, the United States Army used specialized containers to speed the loading and unloading of transport ships. The first vessels purpose-built to carry containers began operation in 1951 and in the U.S. ships began carrying containers between Seattle and Alaska.

Today, approximately 90% of non-bulk cargo worldwide moves by containers stacked on transport ships. There are many different materials available to stabilize and secure cargo in containers now used in all modes of transportation. Conventional load securing methods and materials such as steel banding have been around for decades. Due to technological advancement there are new load securing options available such as polyester strapping and lashing.  All types of tensioned strapping, particularly steel, need to be handled carefully because of potential injury.

Woven cord strapping outperforms steel banding and provides optimum protection against serious injury to employees and customers. Redback’s POWERWEB absorbs impacts and load shifting that would normally break steel banding, and it will not lash-back dangerously when cut.  For more information please visit our site at www.redback.com

Published in uncategorized

Nylon strap has the greatest specific strength of the three plastics, the cost outweighs the strength benefits. In the past nylon strap used to be very popular, but over time polyester has replaced almost all of its use. One application that still uses this type of strap is cold room applications, because it does not creep as much as the other types of plastic.

Corded and woven strapping is available in several constructions, generally in polyester and rayon. Because this system uses a buckle for a joint, corded and woven strapping can have larger system strength than steel banding.   Corded polyester strapping also has higher elongation and memory than other strapping systems, which makes it ideal for sea and rail shipments. Because corded and woven polyester is light and soft, it is also a safer alternative to steel banding and is more environmentally friendly as it is generally reusable.

There are specialized types available for specific applications. For instance, in cold climates a strap bonded in hot melt glue can be used because it is weather-proof.

Composite strapping has filaments embedded in it and is often referred to as “synthetic steel”.  It has the highest joint efficiency when used with a buckle is very abrasion resistant.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time, contact Redback Industries. We will help determine which strapping solution is right for you – contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redbackindustries.com

Nylon strap has the greatest specific strength of the three plastics, the cost outweighs the strength benefits. In the past nylon strap used to be very popular, but over time polyester has replaced almost all of its use. One application that still uses this type of strap is cold room applications, because it does not creep as much as the other types of plastic.

Corded and woven strapping is available in several constructions, generally in polyester and rayon. Because this system uses a buckle for a joint, corded and woven strapping can have larger system strength than steel banding.   Corded polyester strapping also has higher elongation and memory than other strapping systems, which makes it ideal for sea and rail shipments. Because corded and woven polyester is light and soft, it is also a safer alternative to steel banding and is more environmentally friendly as it is generally reusable.

There are specialized types available for specific applications. For instance, in cold climates a strap bonded in hot melt glue can be used because it is weather-proof.

Composite strapping has filaments embedded in it and is often referred to as “synthetic steel”.  It has the highest joint efficiency when used with a buckle is very abrasion resistant.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time, contact Redback Industries. We will help determine which strapping solution is right for you – contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redbackindustries.com

Published in Cargo Securement

Nylon strap has the greatest specific strength of the three plastics, the cost outweighs the strength benefits. In the past nylon strap used to be very popular, but over time polyester has replaced almost all of its use. One application that still uses this type of strap is cold room applications, because it does not creep as much as the other types of plastic.

Corded and woven strapping is available in several constructions, generally in polyester and rayon. Because this system uses a buckle for a joint, corded and woven strapping can have larger system strength than steel banding.   Corded polyester strapping also has higher elongation and memory than other strapping systems, which makes it ideal for sea and rail shipments. Because corded and woven polyester is light and soft, it is also a safer alternative to steel banding and is more environmentally friendly as it is generally reusable.

There are specialized types available for specific applications. For instance, in cold climates a strap bonded in hot melt glue can be used because it is weather-proof.

Composite strapping has filaments embedded in it and is often referred to as “synthetic steel”.  It has the highest joint efficiency when used with a buckle is very abrasion resistant.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time, contact Redback Industries. We will help determine which strapping solution is right for you – contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redbackindustries.com

Published in Cord Strapping
Page 1 of 3