Friday, 01 May 2015 11:29

Cargo Securement Standards

In order to be compliant with regulations, drivers and motor carriers must ensure that their cargo securement devices and systems meet the required performance standards. All devices and systems used to secure cargo must be capable of meeting the requirements of §393.102 which addresses protection against shifting and falling cargo.  Steel strapping, cord strapping and other cargo tie downs used to secure cargo must be installed and maintained to ensure that maximum forces acting on the devices do not exceed the manufacturers breaking strength.

Cargo tie downs and securing devices must not contain knots. If a tie down is repaired, it must be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Each tie down must be attached and secured in a manner that prevents it from becoming loose, unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit. Edge protection must be used whenever a cargo tie down would be subject to abrasion or cutting at the point where it touches an article of cargo. The edge protection must resist abrasion, cutting and crushing.

There are exceptions to the above guidelines. These requirements do not apply to vehicles transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items such as steel or concrete beams, cranes, booms, girders, and trusses, which because of their design, size, shape, or weight, must be fastened by special methods.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time contact Redback Industries. To discuss the strength and tension of a particular product and determine which strapping solution is right for you, contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redback.com

Saturday, 02 May 2015 06:07

Cargo Securement Standards

In order to be compliant with regulations, drivers and motor carriers must ensure that their cargo securement devices and systems meet the required performance standards. All devices and systems used to secure cargo must be capable of meeting the requirements of §393.102 which addresses protection against shifting and falling cargo.  Steel strapping, cord strapping and other cargo tie downs used to secure cargo must be installed and maintained to ensure that maximum forces acting on the devices do not exceed the manufacturers breaking strength.

Cargo tie downs and securing devices must not contain knots. If a tie down is repaired, it must be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Each tie down must be attached and secured in a manner that prevents it from becoming loose, unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit. Edge protection must be used whenever a cargo tie down would be subject to abrasion or cutting at the point where it touches an article of cargo. The edge protection must resist abrasion, cutting and crushing.

There are exceptions to the above guidelines. These requirements do not apply to vehicles transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items such as steel or concrete beams, cranes, booms, girders, and trusses, which because of their design, size, shape, or weight, must be fastened by special methods.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time contact Redback Industries. To discuss the strength and tension of a particular product and determine which strapping solution is right for you, contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redback.com

Published in Cargo Securement
Saturday, 02 May 2015 06:07

Cargo Securement Standards

In order to be compliant with regulations, drivers and motor carriers must ensure that their cargo securement devices and systems meet the required performance standards. All devices and systems used to secure cargo must be capable of meeting the requirements of §393.102 which addresses protection against shifting and falling cargo.  Steel strapping, cord strapping and other cargo tie downs used to secure cargo must be installed and maintained to ensure that maximum forces acting on the devices do not exceed the manufacturers breaking strength.

Cargo tie downs and securing devices must not contain knots. If a tie down is repaired, it must be repaired in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. Each tie down must be attached and secured in a manner that prevents it from becoming loose, unfastening, opening or releasing while the vehicle is in transit. Edge protection must be used whenever a cargo tie down would be subject to abrasion or cutting at the point where it touches an article of cargo. The edge protection must resist abrasion, cutting and crushing.

There are exceptions to the above guidelines. These requirements do not apply to vehicles transporting one or more articles of cargo such as, but not limited to, machinery or fabricated structural items such as steel or concrete beams, cranes, booms, girders, and trusses, which because of their design, size, shape, or weight, must be fastened by special methods.

For cargo securement that offers maximum impact resistance, high joint strength and maintains tension over time contact Redback Industries. To discuss the strength and tension of a particular product and determine which strapping solution is right for you, contact Redback Industries at 1.866.455.1345 or visit our site at www.redback.com

Published in Federal Regulations

At the end of September 2011, The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) network will finish an extremely important pilot project.  Established in November 2010 by container operators that include Evergreen, Hapag-Lloyd, Maersk Line and other companies, the CINS embarked on a project that aimed to reduce accidents caused by improper cargo securement, incorrect weight declaration, and improper packaging.

What did the CINS pilot project involve?

The operators worked in tandem and shared information regarding company cargo accidents, incidents and near accidents.  This information was then compiled in a pilot CINS database.  Using this information, trends were identified concerning high risk load securement and other areas; in turn, this data provided guidance on how to minimize such risks in the future.  Advice how to ensure that cargo will arrive at its destination intact – and general information regarding how to ensure safer container shipping was also given.

How will this pilot project affect the future of the industry?

In the future, the CINS network believes that this database will also show just how widespread certain unsafe practices are in the cargo securement and shipping industry.  In turn, this important information will lead to the proper load securement and shipping legislation changes.  In addition, this information will also result in better load containment and cargo packing training in containers.

Moreover, besides these improvements, the founders of this initiative also hope to improve the quality of cargo delivery and of how individuals in the maritime industry communicate and fulfil obligations.


Redback Industries is committed to bringing you the most up-to-date information on cargo securement regulations.  We have built a strong reputation in the cargo securement industry for providing quality strapping solutions and services at competitive prices.  Redback Industries provides composite cord strappingwoven polyester strapping, and cargo lashing for load securement.  In addition, check out our strap buckles as well as strapping tools and accessories for maximum efficiency and durability.  Find out how we can help you with load restraint at www.redback.com

At the end of September 2011, The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) network will finish an extremely important pilot project.  Established in November 2010 by container operators that include Evergreen, Hapag-Lloyd, Maersk Line and other companies, the CINS embarked on a project that aimed to reduce accidents caused by improper cargo securement, incorrect weight declaration, and improper packaging.

What did the CINS pilot project involve?

The operators worked in tandem and shared information regarding company cargo accidents, incidents and near accidents.  This information was then compiled in a pilot CINS database.  Using this information, trends were identified concerning high risk load securement and other areas; in turn, this data provided guidance on how to minimize such risks in the future.  Advice how to ensure that cargo will arrive at its destination intact – and general information regarding how to ensure safer container shipping was also given.

How will this pilot project affect the future of the industry?

In the future, the CINS network believes that this database will also show just how widespread certain unsafe practices are in the cargo securement and shipping industry.  In turn, this important information will lead to the proper load securement and shipping legislation changes.  In addition, this information will also result in better load containment and cargo packing training in containers.

Moreover, besides these improvements, the founders of this initiative also hope to improve the quality of cargo delivery and of how individuals in the maritime industry communicate and fulfil obligations.


Redback Industries is committed to bringing you the most up-to-date information on cargo securement regulations.  We have built a strong reputation in the cargo securement industry for providing quality strapping solutions and services at competitive prices.  Redback Industries provides composite cord strappingwoven polyester strapping, and cargo lashing for load securement.  In addition, check out our strap buckles as well as strapping tools and accessories for maximum efficiency and durability.  Find out how we can help you with load restraint at www.redback.com

Published in Cargo Securement

At the end of September 2011, The Cargo Incident Notification System (CINS) network will finish an extremely important pilot project.  Established in November 2010 by container operators that include Evergreen, Hapag-Lloyd, Maersk Line and other companies, the CINS embarked on a project that aimed to reduce accidents caused by improper cargo securement, incorrect weight declaration, and improper packaging.

What did the CINS pilot project involve?

The operators worked in tandem and shared information regarding company cargo accidents, incidents and near accidents.  This information was then compiled in a pilot CINS database.  Using this information, trends were identified concerning high risk load securement and other areas; in turn, this data provided guidance on how to minimize such risks in the future.  Advice how to ensure that cargo will arrive at its destination intact – and general information regarding how to ensure safer container shipping was also given.

How will this pilot project affect the future of the industry?

In the future, the CINS network believes that this database will also show just how widespread certain unsafe practices are in the cargo securement and shipping industry.  In turn, this important information will lead to the proper load securement and shipping legislation changes.  In addition, this information will also result in better load containment and cargo packing training in containers.

Moreover, besides these improvements, the founders of this initiative also hope to improve the quality of cargo delivery and of how individuals in the maritime industry communicate and fulfil obligations.


Redback Industries is committed to bringing you the most up-to-date information on cargo securement regulations.  We have built a strong reputation in the cargo securement industry for providing quality strapping solutions and services at competitive prices.  Redback Industries provides composite cord strappingwoven polyester strapping, and cargo lashing for load securement.  In addition, check out our strap buckles as well as strapping tools and accessories for maximum efficiency and durability.  Find out how we can help you with load restraint at www.redback.com

Published in Federal Regulations
Saturday, 02 May 2015 04:58

Factors to Consider in Export Packaging

International shipping puts a number of demands on exporters. There are four potential problems to keep in mind when designing export packaging: breakage, excess weight, moisture and theft.

Export cargo is generally carried in containers. Besides the normal handling encountered in domestic transportation, a shipment transported by ocean freight may be loaded aboard vessels in a net or conveyor which puts added strain on the package. Woven cord strapping can absorb impacts and load shifting that would normally break steel banding. During voyage, goods may be stacked or come into contact with other goods. Once overseas, cargo could be dragged or dropped during unloading.

Avoiding damage to your cargo is the main purpose of export packaging. One of the reasons that containers and pallets have become so standard is that they combine efficiency with unmatched cargo protection.

It is important to take steps to prevent cargo from being tampered with or stolen. Containerization helps with this and using secure polyester cord strapping makes tampering even less likely.

Export packaging should adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Provide proper bracing in the container ensuring that the weight is evenly distributed.
  • Goods should be palletized and whenever possible containerized.
  • Packages should be made of moisture-resistant materials.
  • To avoid theft use cord straps and seals.

Redback Industries specializes in Polyester cord strapping for export packaging. Redback strapping is ideal for securing heavy loads, bundled loads and irregular shaped objects. For more information please visit our site at www.redbackindustries.com

Published in Woven Cord Strapping

Ending nearly three years of deadlock and delay since the last comprehensive funding law expired, the House and Senate, on the 29th of June, approved a two-year highway bill that will fund construction and safety programs though September 2014. Redback Industries fully supports any initiatives which focus on safety while transporting goods, and we consider Redback composite strapping and galvanised buckles to be the safest way of securing heavy loads, bundled loads and irregular shaped objects.

Provisions in the bill of interest to American Trucking Associations  and the trucking industry include:

  • Creation of a clearinghouse to track drug and alcohol test results;
  • A study of crash-worthiness standards for large trucks;
  • Establishment of standards for systems to provide employers with timely notifications of drivers’ moving violations; and
  • Mandatory testing of new carriers entering the industry to verify their knowledge of safety requirements.

House members voted 373-52 for the bill and the Senate followed with a 74-19 tally before a Congressional recess. The measure now goes to President Obama for his signature.

The bill also requires the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration to conduct a field study on the effectiveness of the 34-hour restart provision in its hours-of-service rule.

This restart law allows drivers to reset their weekly work cycles by resting for 34 hours, including two periods between 1am and 5am, in order to reduce driver fatigue.

The legislation “makes tremendous strides in the safety arena and puts down a marker for future improvements to our nation’s freight infrastructure,”  ATA President Bill Graves said in a statement.

Ask Redback Industries about increased safety and security in the trucking industry, and find out more about our composite poly cord strapping which maintains tension over time, and will not rust or damage goods.

Published in Federal Regulations

Ending nearly three years of deadlock and delay since the last comprehensive funding law expired, the House and Senate, on the 29th of June, approved a two-year highway bill that will fund construction and safety programs though September 2014. Redback Industries fully supports any initiatives which focus on safety while transporting goods, and we consider Redback composite strapping and galvanised buckles to be the safest way of securing heavy loads, bundled loads and irregular shaped objects.

Provisions in the bill of interest to American Trucking Associations  and the trucking industry include:

  • Creation of a clearinghouse to track drug and alcohol test results;
  • A study of crash-worthiness standards for large trucks;
  • Establishment of standards for systems to provide employers with timely notifications of drivers’ moving violations; and
  • Mandatory testing of new carriers entering the industry to verify their knowledge of safety requirements.

House members voted 373-52 for the bill and the Senate followed with a 74-19 tally before a Congressional recess. The measure now goes to President Obama for his signature.

The bill also requires the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration to conduct a field study on the effectiveness of the 34-hour restart provision in its hours-of-service rule.

This restart law allows drivers to reset their weekly work cycles by resting for 34 hours, including two periods between 1am and 5am, in order to reduce driver fatigue.

The legislation “makes tremendous strides in the safety arena and puts down a marker for future improvements to our nation’s freight infrastructure,”  ATA President Bill Graves said in a statement.

Ask Redback Industries about increased safety and security in the trucking industry, and find out more about our composite poly cord strapping which maintains tension over time, and will not rust or damage goods.

Published in Cargo Securement

The Port of Grays Harbor Commissioners authorized an $11 million rail construction project recently. Combined with the recently completed first phase rail project, the Port of Grays Harbor is adding more than 36,000 feet of rail capacity in the marine complex to accommodate growing automobile and grain export volumes.

This rural port district on Washington State’s Pacific Coast is demonstrating how their unique transportation links between American producers and growing international markets can stimulate the economy. With export shipping volumes up 85% over 2009 volumes, the Port of Grays Harbor is making strategic investments in rail and marine capacity to ensure their position in global shipping markets.

Although forest products comprise an important part of the Port of Grays Harbor cargo mix, other products like dry agricultural products and automobiles are now the volume leaders through this Pacific Coast port.

Grays Harbor is served by the only active rail system to the coast in Oregon and Washington. Founded in 1911, the Port of Grays Harbor is one of Washington State’s oldest port districts. The Port operates four deepwater marine terminals and hundreds of acres of marine industrial property.

Redback Industries specializes in cargo lashing which stays tight during transit and is ideal for securing heavy loads inside of containers and rail cars, as well as onto vessels, barges and flat rack containers. Redback Industries provides composite strapping, woven polyester strapping and cargo lashing for cargo securement. For more information please visit our site at www.redback.com.

Published in Woven Cord Strapping
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